Archive for January, 2016

Iconic British Rock Star David Bowie Creates a Good Death, a Hero’s Death

Iconic British rock star (singer, writer/poet, actor, dancer, and musician) David Bowie passed away at the tender age of 69 this week, two days after his birthday and the release of a new album.

Who knew he had cancer for 18 months? 

Below is an excerpt from an article I wish I had written based on subjects I like to speak of often – advance planning, creating a way for your end-of-life wishes to be honored, living your last days (if you have terminal illness) in a way you so choose.

Bowie seemed to have experienced a “good death” with the support of family, colleagues, physicians, and undoubtedly a splendid palliative care team. In the next months I trust we will learn more about the kind of care he had. What I like most is that he seemed to have been honored by those around him, that he manifested a way to live to see his birthday and the release of his album.  Rest in peace dear soul.

Here below is the excerpt from http://www.chtonicboom.com by Diana S-V. It is worth going to the web site to read the rest of the report…

How to Die Like Bowie, or, We Can Be Heroes

Posted in Music on January 12, 2016 by Diana S-V

bowie

A picture from David Bowie’s final photoshoot, shot by Jimmy King.

By now, everyone has heard the news of David Bowie’s death of cancer at sixty-nine years of age. Bowie’s death came two days after his birthday and the simultaneous release of his newest album, Blackstar, and so many fans and Bowie aficionados likely received this news after a few days of appreciating the new album, revisiting old favourites, and generally appreciating the oeuvre of a man whose work, words, and aesthetic profoundly changed them in some way.

When I first read the news of his death, the first thing I felt was shock. The second thing that I felt was appreciation that what I was feeling was shock. Let me explain: Bowie is one of the most famous and widely known musical artists to have ever lived, and if he was living with cancer for eighteen months without it being public knowledge, it was very deliberate. This means that he, his family, and his colleagues had to make several complicated arrangements to ensure their privacy, and it also means that the folks who were a part of Bowie’s inner circle had to respect that desire for privacy. In other words, a number of factors had to be in place—human, bureaucratic, legal, and more—in order for Bowie to confront his death in the way that we wanted.\
The more I learn about things like his final photoshoot, the deliberate timing of the release of the video for “Lazarus,” and the tone of ★ (Blackstar) the more I appreciate what a good death looked like for David Bowie, especially given how much labour, organizing, and effort had to be expended in order to make this good death happened. In the weeks to follow, we will likely learn even more about Bowie’s final months and his approach to dying of a terminal illness, but in the meantime, what can we learn about how to die from Bowie? What can we learn about how to make a good death happen for ourselves? Here’s another way to think about it: how can we emulate, in a meaningful way, the worldview and courage of a man that was so widely admired and loved? I’ll be going into more detail in subsequent blog posts about my encounters with the following topics, but it seems to be that David Bowie’s good death consisted of several basic components or actions that we can all practice ourselves. (web site cited above has rest of Diane’s worthy story).

Here is a link to the Lazarus video referred to above…

http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/84892627/

January 12, 2016 at 3:10 pm 2 comments