Caregivers, Death and Dying, Death in Mexico, End-of-Life Care, Senior Care Mexico

American Architect Creates Moving Medical Art Installation in El Sacrificio, Mexico

In February 2019, El Ojo del Lago (The Eye of the Lake), an English-language publication at Lake Chapala, Mexico catering to 20,000 high season retirees from north-of-the-border, dedicated a section of its magazine to articles on End-of-Life.

Each contributor has worked in Senior Care and End-of-Life care for over 20 years. A piece I wrote was included. See the link (looks good there) or, you may read the copy below the link on this page.

https://www.chapala.com/elojo/february-2019/244-articles-2019/february-2019/4492-ode-to-love-and-care-giving-an-art-installation-at-el-sacrificio-mexico

ODE TO LOVE AND CAREGIVING AT A CHAPALA, MEXICO ART INSTALLATION

It is a notable synchronicity that “Transcendence – A Celebration of Those with Perseverance”, a medical art installation created by LK Gubelman (Leslie Katherine aka Kate), is located in El Sacrificio (the Sacrifice), Jalisco, Mexico.

Gubelman, an architect by profession, was caregiver to her retired and ill parents (mom Canadian, dad American) over the course of eight years at Lake Chapala, Mexico. Her creation is based on what she witnessed as she put her life aside to assist and honor her father and mother. The installation is also, she might share with you, how she has been meeting her irrevocable losses and sadness. The art has been her therapy.

The Transcendence exhibit in El Sacrificio is located inside “Los Conos”, cone-shaped granaries that continue to serve as art studio. Once you enter the big cone you cannot help but notice what is before you – six large scale works that required several years to complete (2015-2018) with the assistance of six men.

What will you see?

Depending on your own interpretation, the exhibit offers a way to reflect on life and death, from the point of view of the caregiver and Kate’s parents.

The largest of the pieces – THRESHOLDS – UMBRALES – is what you notice first. From the entrance, it resembles a beautiful stained glass window. Up close you see a symbolic body surrounded and connected by IV bottles filled with bright-colored water through plastic tubing. According to the artist, this piece is about time passing; each frame telling a tale of care given and the will to persevere. Every bottle was actually used at home.

Thresholds by Kate Gubelman

ENTANGLEMENT – ENREDO is a lattice work of medications, pills and pill boxes hung from the ceiling in suspended form, dazzling with crystal and beads linking one to another like Christmas decorations. Standing under it you cannot help but notice enormity of drugs consumed and what was required by caregiver Kate for medical management. All medication boxes and packets were used by Kate’s parents.

TRANSPARENCY – TRANSPARENCIA is a corridor of x-ray images, CT scans, MRIs mounted on translucent multi-colored panels described best by the publicist as “a tunnel of muted light and color…and a tale of medical machinery (cold steel) and the toll on all involved.” The names of Kate’s parents, Allison and Oscar, are on the panels.

Artist and caregiver Kate concludes, “there was no choice but to create the installation. It was a necessity, it helped my healing.”

Aside from honoring the wishes of her parents, and their lives, Gubelman bears witness to medical choices involved to keep her parents alive.  Somehow, she felt compelled during the caregiving years, to collect and keep pill packages, intravenous bottles, medical records, x-rays, and other mementos.

Little did she know at the time they would become the basis of her installation.

What might you discover or experience?

You may instantly relate to Kate Gubelman’s art pieces, or not. According to Gubelman there are a variety of responses. Many visitors, both gringo and Mexican have felt either saddened or amazed. Many find deep meaning, especially recent widows and widowers who have been caregivers themselves.

Visitors have called the installation captivating, thought-provoking, emotional, and loving.

There is a video of the art installation with visitor comments produced by Bradley Guarano of www.videoparami.com It may be found on this link… https://www.dropbox.com/s/9lh8iv861tb1lny/Transcendence.mp4?dl=0

At minimum, you may feel sacrifice and perseverance were involved not only for Gubelman, but for her parents.  An act of love? A comment on modern medicine? No matter your read, it is an immersive art experience.

Who might wish to see the exhibit Transcendence?

Caregivers, healthcare workers, perhaps those mourning the loss of loved ones, and, the general public

For more information or to schedule a private studio tour, please contact Bethany Anne Putnam 

bethany@lkgubelman.com
USA: 001.508.221.6430
MEX: +52.331.157.2300

You may discover more on the LK Gubelman Facebook page, or find photos of the exhibit on Instagram@ lkgubelman.

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Aging, Assisted Living Mexico, CCRC's in Mexico, Death in Mexico, Dying in Mexico, End-of-Life Planning, Expats, Life Plan Communities Mexico, Mexico, Nursing Homes Mexico, Senior Care Mexico

Senior Care Specialist for Mexico Talks about Assisted Living & Nursing Care in Mexico, and Why End-of-Life Planning for Ex-pats is a Good Idea

I am grateful to Focus on Mexico, where I address the ever-changing topics in Mexico (and elsewhere) of independent living, assisted living, nursing care, Life Plan Communities (CCRC’s – there is only one so far with others being developed).

The next talk to the Focus on Mexico attendees is March 21 at 11:15 a.m. at a hotel in Ajijic, Mexico. See https://www.focusonmexico.com/focus-6-day-program/   Focus on Mexico offers seminars to folks interested in how to move to and/or live in Mexico.  All presenters at Focus on Mexico are volunteers.

On Friday, March 29, I will be speaking at a FREE community event (open to the public) at the Lake Chapala Society Sala in Ajijic at Lake Chapala, Mexico at 2:00 p.m. on Why End-of-Life Planning is a Good Idea for Ex-Pats in Mexico.

Veladoras for Guadalupe and those we’ve lost, Mexico City Cathedral

Here below are links to articles I have written on the above-referenced subjects:

https://wellnessshepherd.com/2018/09/11/why-creating-an-end-of-life-plan-for-expats-in-mexico-is-a-good-idea/ 

https://www.seniorhousingforum.net/blog/2016/8/3/will-mexico-solve-senior-living-affordability-problem   

https://wellnessshepherd.com/2017/10/10/guidelines-for-choosing-assisted-livingnursing-care-in-mexico/

Wendy Jane Carrel, M.A., a Spanish-speaking senior care specialist, has spent over seven years traveling province to province in Chile, Ecuador, and Mexico researching senior living options. She acts as an advisor or liaison for those who wish assistance negotiating health systems, senior care options, end-of-life care, and disposition of remains.

 

 

 

 

Assisted Living Mexico, Health & Wellness, Living Abroad, Mexico, Mexico Senior Living, Nursing Homes Mexico, Senior Care Mexico

Wendy Jane Carrel Speaks on Mexican Assisted Living, Nursing Care at Focus on Mexico

Throughout 2018, I have been invited to address Focus on Mexico participants, a lively and engaged group of mostly retirees from Canada and the U.S. curious about Mexico, curious enough to perhaps make a move.

I talk about senior living options, including possibilities at Lake Chapala.

I share a power point presentation with a few statistics and show photographs based on several years of due diligence and relationship building in 16 states of the country. I review independent living, assisted living, and nursing care – what’s here, what the differences are from home, what’s missing, and what is being created for the next generation that may be in need – boomers.

My VOLUNTEER talk shares an insider’s view for those who wish to consider living south-of-the-border. Other speakers focus on real estate, banking, buying cars, health insurance, medical care, bringing pets, etc.

My next talk is the week of October 29, 2018.

Wendy Jane Carrel with Michael Nuschke, Director of Focus on Mexico, addressing participants

If you are interested to learn about Focus seminars and activities, please see their web site at http://www.FocusonMexico.com. The popular education group is celebrating its 20th year.

Note: My articles are posted on http://www.WellnessShepherd.com. Sometimes they are re-posted on other web sites. If an article does not have my by-line, it is not by me. And, I do not post lists.

Some folks with good intentions, but without senior care experience and/or education, write articles and create lists with recommendations. Unless they are health care professionals, they may not be conversant with possible challenges of moving older adults from one nation to another, where the staff turnover is high, how the staff is trained, how med management is handled, what the activities are, and other subjects related to quality of life.

Aging, Alzheimer's, Assisted Living, Assisted Living Mexico, CCRC's in Mexico, Health & Wellness, Life Planning Communities Mexico, Living Abroad, Mexico, Mexico Senior Living, Senior Care Mexico

Guidelines for Choosing Assisted Living/Nursing Care in Mexico

Gardens at Casa de las Lunas in Puerto Vallarta with independent living, assisted living and respite care, private pay

According to realtors at Lake Chapala, Mexico, and the information desk at the Lake Chapala Society in Ajijic, the popular ex-pat retirement destination has received more than double the no. of potential renters, buyers, and information hungry folks from Canada and the U.S. than in years before. (Other popular retirement destinations are also seeing an increase in activity – see no. 3 below).

Among visitors intent on moving are travel aficionados looking for a unique cultural experience, the prospect of meeting stimulating people from all parts of the world, but more importantly, an opportunity to stretch their dollars.

And then there is senior living and healthcare, a subject of interest for most. For “sandwich-generation” boomers who lost savings and/or homes during the American recession of 2007-8, or spent savings for the education of millennial children or grandchildren, many are finding there may be little left for themselves or parents if assisted living or nursing care are ever required.

An added concern is that funding for Medicare and Medicaid in the U.S. are currently being challenged.

Alma, a non-profit home for 40 residents in San Miguel Allende

If the cost of assisted and continuing care in Canada (Canada takes care of its disabled, ill, and older adults through universal care programs but there is also private pay care) or the U.S. is not an option, there are more affordable options in other countries. The closest place to look is Mexico.

Here are guidelines for looking at assisted living and continuing care in Mexico, costing between $600 USD to $3500 USD/month, depending on the value of the American dollar and the Canadian dollar vs. the peso, the location, and the residence you choose:

  1. Take note – in Mexico the terms assisted living and “nursing home” are often one and the same, with exceptions. Care facilities are not known as they are north of the border – assisted living, rehabilitation, nursing home, and hospice. It is often an all-in-one approach. Also, with some exceptions, homes mix physically disabled residents with memory care residents.
  2. Select cities or areas you wish to be in for climate – coastal, desert, mountains. (Coastal tropical places cost a little more because A/C is expensive).
  3. If the future resident does not speak Spanish, seek places with ex-pat communities and English-speaking locals who are often a source of volunteers – Baja California Norte (Ensenada, Rosarito Beach, Tijuana), Cancun, Lake Chapala, Mazatlan, Mexico City, Puerto Vallarta. Or, choose smaller places such as Merida, and San Miguel Allende. Some care homes have all foreigners as residents, others locals and foreigners together. Usually one person on staff speaks English, sometimes more than one.
  4. Do the due diligence. Research places and determine costs. Most assisted living and “nursing homes” catering to foreigners have web sites in English easily found on Google Search.
  5. Consider private pay homes and non-profits, as well as residences run by nuns whether you are Catholic or not. Nuns often (but not always) provide quality care as most are nurses with a mission to serve, plus costs tend to be what Mexicans would pay if price is a consideration. Another level of care is found in government homes, some pleasant others not; some accept foreigners with residency cards. There are differences in every region of the country, and there are no rules.
  6. Note: no two places will be alike – financially, environmentally, socially, and in terms of care. Homes are not regulated with the strict standards one is accustomed to in Canada and the U.S.  However, there are places with quality care and high standards.
  7. Conduct site visits. Assess for yourself what might be an acceptable match in terms of environment and people. Would you or your loved one feel comfortable and safe? Do you like the space, the staff?  How are you welcomed? Do residents seem cared for or are they alone in “God’s waiting room” without attention and activities? Ask residents what they like best and what they don’t like. How clean is the home? Standards differ from place to place. Arrive at meal time… is there enough assistance for each resident? Is food fresh, nutritious, and nicely presented? Is it food you would or could eat? Does the home prepare meals compatible with health challenges? What about care plans and medication management? What about emergencies? How are these matters handled?
Patio at a private pay “nursing” home, Casa Nostra, at Lake Chapala

 

Casa de los Abuelos DIF (government) home for seniors, Morelia – these homes are intended for Mexican nationals but on occasion persons with residency visas who pay are accepted, depends on the place and availability

There are no simple answers for selection.

Ideally, we would all have perfect health to our last days and an abundance of funds which would allow us to receive the best possible care wherever we choose to live.

Note: CCRC’s (Continuing Care Retirement Communities, from independent living to demise), now referred to as Life Plan Communities, have not arrived in Mexico, with one exception. There are plans in the works for Life Plan Communities in Baja California, Cancun, and at Lake Chapala from American, Canadian, Mexican, and Spanish developers.

References:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=6lYA7c1Pnuo   Ajijic, Mexico video 2017

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/foreign-retirees-flocking-mexico/

https://www.seniorhousingforum.net/blog/2016/8/3/will-mexico-solve-senior-living-affordability-problem

Aging, Assisted Living Mexico, Mexico Grandparents Day/Dia del Abuelo Mexico, Mexico Senior Living, Senior Care Mexico

Mexico Celebrates Grandparents Day (Dia del Abuelo) August 28, 2017

Throughout Mexico, children and grandchildren make a point of spending time with their elders on August 28. They also bring gifts. This year, because the official day is Monday, most festivities and visits were held over the weekend.

Note: The tradition of celebrating Grandparents Day was instituted in 1983 under the presidency of Lazaro Cardenas. During the 1990’s, announcer Edgar Gaytan promoted the special day on a radio program dedicated to older adults.  It has become an important event for families.

 

Arriving at Ohana Assisted Living, San Juan Cosala, Jalisco, Mexico for Grandparents Day Celebration

This year, Ohana Assisted Living in San Juan Cosala at Lake Chapala in the state of Jalisco honored its residents with a grand party that included relatives and friends, staff, folkloric dancers, an extraordinary jazz band with musical choices remembered by the generation of residents, and a beautifully prepared buffet. The residents at Ohana are from Canada, Mexico, and the U.S.

Hosts Ana and Alonzo, both geriatric nurses who live on the lovely campus, warmly greeted all. They produced a memorable event.

Ana and Alonzo, geriatric nurses, owners of Ohana Assisted Living

 

Fabulous Mexican summer fruit at Ohana Assisted Living, known for its quality meals and treats

 

Grandparents Day cake at Ohana Assisted Living, Mexico

 

Folkloric dancers near the Ohana Assisted Living pool

The dancers changed costumes three times and by the end of their performances they had gone from pastels to bright and colorful red, white, and black!! Loved the zapadiada dancing. Fun for all.

Grandparents Day Celebration with live jazz band at Ohana Assisted Living, Mexico

 

Former heavy weight wrestler. salsa teacher, and LA Times writer Ken in rehab after a fall in California, accompanied by adorable caregivers
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Bob, U.S. Air Force retired, with his caregiver who lovingly calls him “joven”, young one because of his bright spirit
Aging, Health & Wellness, Mexico, Mexico Senior Living, Older Adults, Senior Care Mexico

International Day of the Older Adult is Celebrated in Guadalajara, Mexico

The International Day of Older Adults is celebrated, by proclamation of the United Nations, on October 1 every year.

In Mexico this event dovetails with the country’s Senior Day at the end of September. Festivities are held at senior centers, senior homes, and on DIF (government social service) grounds.

For those of you who haven’t been to Mexico, especially Guadalajara, its “tapatio” residents love to sing and dance no matter their age. Being around these folks will automatically lift your spirits. They love to dress up, eat well, and have fun.  Most of all, they never give up despite mobility issues or aches and pains.

Tapatio singing seniors
Tapatio singing seniors

In Mexico there are 7.5 million persons 70 or older. This number is expected to reach 8.5 million in 2020, and 10.2 million by 2030.  According to the Mexican government, at 60 you are an older adult. It is unclear why the number of boomers and persons ages 60-70 are not included in the Mexican government statistics (INEGI) reports.

In the U.S. there are 70-80 million adults who  will be over 65 by 2020.

This year I attended the Asilo Juan Pablo II senior day festivities (see earlier post September 2016) at http://www.WellnessShepherd.com .

Last year I attended an event at DIF’s Centro de Amistad Internacional (Center of International Friendship) on Calle Eulogio Parra 2539 just off Lopez Mateo in Guadalajara. It was co-hosted by the Office of Older Adults for the State of Jalisco, Mexico and by INAPAM ( the National Institute for Older Adults, est. in 2002). It was held on the first Sunday of October from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Groups of seniors performed dances, ladies were offered free beauty treatments by the Irma de Zuniga make-up academy located on Lopez Cotilla in downtown Guadalajara (www.irmadezuniga.com), there were talks by gerontologists, nutritionists and others experts. Jhre Chacon and his team of healing touch trainees from UNCOA offered massages, Reiki, and other relaxing experiences for the guests. There were also poetry readings and card games.

Tapatio caballeros
Tapatio caballeros

 

older adult folkloric dancers, Guadalajara
older adult folkloric dancers, Guadalajara

 

healing touch holistic care for older adults, Guadalajara
healing touch holistic care for older adults, Guadalajara, offered by UNCOA

 

Queen for a Day make-up gift for older adults, Guadalajara
Queen for a Day make-up gift for older adults, Guadalajara

Ana Maria Luz Garcia, owner of the historic restaurant La Fonda de Arcangel Miguel (www.fondasanmiguelarcangel.com, housed in a colonial convent in the center of Guadalajara), hosted the buffet breakfast/brunch. Garcia is a passionate advocate for healthy living at any age.

Consuelo Manzo Chavez, Director of Older Adults for DIF presided with Alma Solis Montiel, who at the time was the Director of INAPAM but is now the Director General of the Institute for Older Adults for the State of Jalisco.

International Day of Older Adults with DIF and INAPAM Directors & amigita Leila
International Day of Older Adults with Senior Care Advisor Wendy Jane Carrel, DIF Director Consuelo Manzo Chavez, and former INAPAM Director Alma Solis – now Director of the Institute of Older Adults for the state of Jalisco, with unidentified older adult, and human rights attorney Laila Martinez de Santiago
Aging, Assisted Living, Health & Wellness, Mexico, Mexico Senior Living, Older Adults, Senior Care Mexico

Mexico Honors Older Adults August 28, Dia del Adulto Mayor 2016

sweet resident with sweet volunteer Mari
Sweet Zenaida, daughter of Juan Pablo II resident Jose, with precious volunteer Mari who is not only a warm greeter at the home but is part of the outreach to over 30 seniors in the neighborhood

This week Guadalajara, Mexico has seen senior centers, DIF (government social services), non-profits serving older adults, and private sector senior residences celebrating Mexico’s Day of the Older Adult, also referred to as Dia de los Abuelos (Day of the Grandparents). The occasion has been feted every August 28 since 1982.

Guadalajara’s parish of San Bernardo, a social justice block with a church serving 3,000 parishioners, houses a two floor senior home, Asilo Juan Pablo II,  where festivities have been in full force. (The diocese also provides a school for Downs Syndrome children, a rehabilitation home for over 50 men, and a palliative care and hospice with 8 beds and outreach to 65 patients, Juntos Contra el Dolor). The Sr. Cura of the Church, Father Engelberto Polino Sanchez is the guardian for the community.

On Saturday, August 27, DIF sponsored a breakfast for the 52 male and female residents. On Sunday, August 28, Father Engelberto celebrated mass. Afterward, the older adults enjoyed a meal of pozole (a stew of vegetables, hominy, and pork) served with jamaica (a hibiscus drink), plus live Mexican music provided by an electric piano and a singer. Mexicans love festivities and the seniors at Asilo Juan Pablo II are no different. They were happy campers.

Below are photos commemorating those in support of older adults, as well as the appreciative seniors who live at Asilo Juan Pablo II. It is a Mexican custom for the older generation not to smile too quickly in photos. An exception, the charming church priests below with their energy of light…

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Sr. Cura Engelberto who presided mass for the seniors on Mexican Day of Older Adults pictured with Padre Francisco of Templo de San Bernardo, Guadalajara
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Reverent seniors, about 30 of whom are wheel chair bound at Asilo Juan Pablo II, Guadalajara, attending mass on Mexico’s Day of Older Adults
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senior who is not feeling well with Alicia, an adorable favorite enjoying pozole
DSCN0148
disabled senior with super attentive wife who kindly dances with and cheers up other seniors
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Severely disabled man Eliseo who is not a senior, rescued from the street and given a home at Asilo Juan Pablo II.  He is popular for his enthusiasm
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Dancing at Day of the Older Adults, Asilo Juan Pablo II, Guadalajara, Mexico

Note:  The Juan Pablo II home, a non-profit, is well run. There are challenges with raising funds and providing enough for the residents. The home survives successfully, none the less. Seniors with pensions pay for private or shared rooms. There are indigent seniors who have been rescued. One disabled man around the age of 50, was found in the streets and is living most contentedly at the assisted living, as mentioned in photo above.

The dedicated administrator Bertha C. Gonzalez offers a clean, efficient service with good standards for quality of life in Mexico, up to and including Mexican carino (kindness and care). She hand selects and supervises a team of nursing assistants and nurses, many of whom are sent by various schools to train at the home. Every day there is occupational therapy and some form of physical workout. Every other day there is entertainment, among other activities. Many residents are talented artists, handicrafts experts, and poets. The home is connected to the large church so that those in wheelchairs can attend services easily. Being Catholic is not a requirement for residency. The home is currently full. There is a waiting list.

The senior home has outreach to around 30 elders living in the neighborhood through its volunteer group Asilo en Salida. Mari, featured in the first photo, also goes out with the group.  For more information about the activities write to asiloensalida@gmail.com

Contact info:

Asilo Juan Pablo II  Pro Dignidad Humana, AC   asilojp@prodigy.com.mx

Av. Plan de San Luis #1616  Col. Mezquitan Country  tel. 3824-5368

Sr. Cura Engelberto Polino Sanchez, Director General

Bertha C. Gonzalez, Administrator    Maria Delores Cortes, social worker

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Asilo-Juan-Pablo-II-San-Bernardo-100984640248947/