Mexico Palliative Care Non-Profit Holds Festive Fundraiser in Super-Competitive Environment

Mexican non-profits have a hard time surviving. One can say many non-profits, no matter the country, find it challenging to be sustainable.

In the state of Jalisco, there are over 800 registered A.C.’s, Asociaciónes Civiles, or non-profits. In all of Mexico, there are about 4,000 registered non-profits. That’s a lot of competition in a land where philanthropy, though existent, is not part of the culture.

Juntos Contra el Dolor of Guadalajara is a remarkable entity. It is a Mexican model for palliative care and hospice. Its resourceful, enthusiastic founder and palliative care educator Dra Susana Lua Nava is an ecumenical nun. Her team serves anyone of any belief system or economic background. All are dedicated to offering holistic pain relief for life-limiting conditions or at end-of-life.

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Administration volunteer Michele Carrillo, Madre Martina Zumaya Head of Nursing, Dra Susana Lua Nava founder, Dra Karla Rebollar of Juntos Contra el Dolor A.C.

In 2014 Dra Susana Lua Nava and Juntos Contra el Dolor received the prestigious state of Jalisco IJAS award for outstanding contributions by a non-profit.

Juntos Contra el Dolor’s 24/7 humanitarian effort includes not only medical attention at its 8-bed hospital but outreach and education to 65 or more patients and their families at home. For a Mexican non-profit dependent on donations, this is an achievement. Faith in the need, faith in all possibilities, and a lot of love are components of the Juntos ability to continue despite obstacles.

Every member of the team is a volunteer except the nurses. The team consists of palliative care doctors, psychologists, social workers, chaplains, and trained volunteers.

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Four social workers, two MD’s (far right), all Juntos Contra el Dolor volunteers

Juntos Contra el Dolor held its annual fundraiser, a Fiesta Mexicana gala, on Saturday, September 24.

The nuns and volunteers led by Dra Susana Lua Nava proved to be creative and super organized.
Every detail was attended to – philodendron plants, potted geraniums, Viva Mexico banners, red/green/white flags hanging from the ceilings, red/green/white bow ties over white blouses or shirts so people would know who the volunteers were, donated chocolate cake from one of the best bakeries in town, clean white table cloths and chair covers, a tequila bar, a hand-made hot organic corn tortilla corner, and a place for photos where guests could dress like a revolutionary from the Mexican independence. Fresh quality food included 10 guisados (entrees) prepared with love and served in Mexican pottery, a rarity at charity events in Jalisco. And, there was a romantic singing group Los Bohemios, plus an all-girl mariachi band dressed in hot pink and silver!!  A lively event and fun for all.
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Sweet volunteers Lola, Maria, and Nena

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Volunteer Juan with his lovely, sensitive mother – his father, her husband, passed away at Juntos Contra el Dolor in June 2016

beautiful Mexican ladies of the San Bernardo parish

beautiful Mexican ladies of the San Bernardo parish

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junior guests

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All-girl mariachi band from Guadalajara

Juntos Contra el Dolor provides weekly consultations in a donated space in San Augustin, a suburb to the west of Guadalajara. By January 2017 there will  be consultations for those suffering from pain at Lake Chapala, an hour from Guadalajara. The offices will be in the Church of San Juan Batista in San Juan Cosala.

As mentioned, the non-profit stays afloat by donations – usually in-kind support such as diapers, linen, paper supplies, fresh organic food, and new medicines.At the following link you can read what is needed and where one can make donations.  http://juntoscontraeldolor.com/Donaciones/don.html

Dr. Lua received three years of specialized palliative care training in the Canary Islands with Dr. Marcos Gomez Sancho, considered the leading palliative care physician and professor of the Latin world. Dr. Lua is a thought leader for Mexico, and author of  El Enfermo: Terreno Sagrado  (The Ill: Sacred Terrain).

September 26, 2016 at 7:18 pm Leave a comment

Abandoned Elders Rescued in Ecuador

 

Wendy Jane Carrel with Diosalinda at rescue home in Chordeleg, Ecuador

Senior Care Specialist and health journalist Wendy Jane Carrel with Diosalinda at rescue home in Chordeleg, Ecuador

For those of you who haven’t seen it before, above is a photo of yours truly with Diosalinda. She led a terrible life of abuse by family before she was rescued by a home for abandoned seniors in Chordeleg, Ecuador four years ago. If I had funds, I would have adopted her. Such a gentle, loving, sensitive soul for all she endured.

Did you notice the Dios in the name Diosalinda? Dios = God in Spanish. At the end of her life she finally has peace, protection, and safety.

 

Please find below a link to my article at http://www.CuencaHighLife.com  on how impoverished and abandoned elders are rescued in Ecuador. It is far from complete, but it is based on site visits to almost every province in the country.

Abandoned and impoverished elders: A looming crisis in Ecuador and worldwide

September 5, 2016 at 2:43 pm 1 comment

Mexico Honors Older Adults August 28, Dia del Adulto Mayor 2016

sweet resident with sweet volunteer Mari

Sweet Zenaida, daughter of Juan Pablo II resident Jose, with precious volunteer Mari who is not only a warm greeter at the home but is part of the outreach to over 30 seniors in the neighborhood

This week Guadalajara, Mexico has seen senior centers, DIF (government social services), non-profits serving older adults, and private sector senior residences celebrating Mexico’s Day of the Older Adult, also referred to as Dia de los Abuelos (Day of the Grandparents). The occasion has been feted every August 28 since 1982.

Guadalajara’s parish of San Bernardo, a social justice block with a church serving 3,000 parishioners, houses a two floor senior home, Asilo Juan Pablo II,  where festivities have been in full force. (The diocese also provides a school for Downs Syndrome children, a rehabilitation home for over 50 men, and a palliative care and hospice with 8 beds and outreach to 65 patients, Juntos Contra el Dolor). The Sr. Cura of the Church, Father Engelberto Polino Sanchez is the guardian for the community.

On Saturday, August 27, DIF sponsored a breakfast for the 52 male and female residents. On Sunday, August 28, Father Engelberto celebrated mass. Afterward, the older adults enjoyed a meal of pozole (a stew of vegetables, hominy, and pork) served with jamaica (a hibiscus drink), plus live Mexican music provided by an electric piano and a singer. Mexicans love festivities and the seniors at Asilo Juan Pablo II are no different. They were happy campers.

Below are photos commemorating those in support of older adults, as well as the appreciative seniors who live at Asilo Juan Pablo II. It is a Mexican custom for the older generation not to smile too quickly in photos. An exception, the charming church priests below with their energy of light…

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Sr. Cura Engelberto who presided mass for the seniors on Mexican Day of Older Adults pictured with Padre Francisco of Templo de San Bernardo, Guadalajara

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Reverent seniors, about 30 of whom are wheel chair bound at Asilo Juan Pablo II, Guadalajara, attending mass on Mexico’s Day of Older Adults

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senior who is not feeling well with Alicia, an adorable favorite enjoying pozole

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disabled senior with super attentive wife who kindly dances with and cheers up other seniors

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Severely disabled man Eliseo who is not a senior, rescued from the street and given a home at Asilo Juan Pablo II.  He is popular for his enthusiasm

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Dancing at Day of the Older Adults, Asilo Juan Pablo II, Guadalajara, Mexico

Note:  The Juan Pablo II home, a non-profit, is well run. There are challenges with raising funds and providing enough for the residents. The home survives successfully, none the less. Seniors with pensions pay for private or shared rooms. There are indigent seniors who have been rescued. One disabled man around the age of 50, was found in the streets and is living most contentedly at the assisted living, as mentioned in photo above.

The dedicated administrator Bertha C. Gonzalez offers a clean, efficient service with good standards for quality of life in Mexico, up to and including Mexican carino (kindness and care). She hand selects and supervises a team of nursing assistants and nurses, many of whom are sent by various schools to train at the home. Every day there is occupational therapy and some form of physical workout. Every other day there is entertainment, among other activities. Many residents are talented artists, handicrafts experts, and poets. The home is connected to the large church so that those in wheelchairs can attend services easily. Being Catholic is not a requirement for residency. The home is currently full. There is a waiting list.

The senior home has outreach to around 30 elders living in the neighborhood through its volunteer group Asilo en Salida. Mari, featured in the first photo, also goes out with the group.  For more information about the activities write to asiloensalida@gmail.com

Contact info:

Asilo Juan Pablo II  Pro Dignidad Humana, AC   asilojp@prodigy.com.mx

Av. Plan de San Luis #1616  Col. Mezquitan Country  tel. 3824-5368

Sr. Cura Engelberto Polino Sanchez, Director General

Bertha C. Gonzalez, Administrator    Maria Delores Cortes, social worker

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Asilo-Juan-Pablo-II-San-Bernardo-100984640248947/

 

August 31, 2016 at 11:47 am Leave a comment

Palliative Care/Hospice Juntos Contra el Dolor of Mexico Holds Kermes (Fundraiser)

Juntos Contra el Dolor - we are helping diminish pain

Juntos Contra el Dolor – “we are helping diminish pain”

 

Juntos Contra el Dolor, A.C., the only 24-7 palliative care/hospice in Jalisco, Mexico, held a kermes to raise funds for its humanitarian medical effort which aides patients with chronic pain, and, at end of life. The Juntos team also provides psychological and spiritual support to families of patients.

The kermes was held on a Sunday from 8 a.m.to 2 p.m. outside the Templo of San Bernardo on Plan San Luis in northwestern Guadalajara, a church with 3,000 parishioners.

A Mexican kermes is an outdoor party for a special cause. To support the cause, people buy food and drink. The Juntos kermes served tacos with birria, quesadillas, homemade jamaica (a hibiscus drink) and horchata (a rice drink). Juntos brochures were on each table.

The nurses, who are the only paid staff (except for volunteer retired nurse Rocio), were taking care of patients at the hospital around the block..

The Spanish word kermes is derived from the Turkish word kermes which originally meant a handicraft bazaar to raise money for charity. It is also derived from the Dutch word kermesse, (kerk = church, mis = mass), a festival after mass.

setting tables for the kermes

setting tables for the kermes

founder Dra Susana Lua Nava with volunteer nurse Rocio

Founder Dra Susana Lua Nava with volunteer nurse Rocio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

volunteer nurse Rocio and volunteer coordinator Nena

volunteer nurse Rocio and volunteer coordinator Nena

social workers Silvia and Lupita

volunteer social workers Silvia and Lupita

 

sister volunteers, administrator Sara on the right

sister volunteers – Marta and administrator Sara on the right

 

August 17, 2016 at 3:18 am 2 comments

Senior Care/Senior Living Options at Lake Chapala, Mexico

Not long ago I addressed a group of Canadians and Americans at an Open Circle chat at the Lake Chapala Society in Ajijic, Mexico. Most of the attendees were full-time residents with the lay of the land, but curious newcomers attended as well.

The most meaningful part of the presentation?  Introducing American and Mexican senior living owners to the audience. After the chat they were able to become acquainted with one another.

In the photo below, four Mexican registered nurse owners are represented. I am the person holding the microphone.

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Senior Care Specialist Wendy Jane Carrel introduces owners of Senior Homes at Lake Chapala to Americans and Canadians

Senior Housing Forum posted my article based on the talk.. See http://tinyurl.com/zoz9zdf or https://www.seniorhousingforum.net/blog/2016/8/3/will-mexico-solve-senior-living-affordability-problem  to read the entire piece, or,  read below…

Will Mexico Solve the Senior Living Affordability Problem?

Published on Wed, 08/03/2016 – 4:55pm

By Wendy Jane Carrel, wellnessshepherd.com

If you cannot afford healthcare or retirement in Canada or the U.S., what are your options? Where do you look?

For the last five decades, and especially since the U.S. economic challenges that became apparent in 2007-2008, retirees have been choosing destinations in Asia, Europe, and Latin America.

Despite news about crime and drug cartels, Mexico reigns as the number one choice for most American and Canadians, primarily because of its lower costs, warmer weather, health care choices, and location so close to home.

According to U.S. Consulates in Mexico there is a current count of between 1.2 – 1.4 million Americans living in Baja California, Cancun, Lake Chapala, Mazatlan, Puerto Vallarta, San Miguel Allende, and other areas. (The number also includes Americans who are not retired). According to the Canadian Consulate in Guadalajara and the Canadians Abroad Registry, approximately 10,000 Canadians are registered in high season and 1,500 are registered as retired full time in Mexico. Not all Canadians register.

Choices for senior living in Mexico are not all that dissimilar to those in Canada and the U.S.:

  • Aging in Place – independent living in your own home or apartment

  • Aging in Community – co-housing

  • Assisted Living – if you require care and cannot afford full-time care at home

  • Nursing Care and Rehabilitation

Lake Chapala

Currently, at Lake Chapala, Mexico there are in the neighborhood of 20,000 retired Americans and Canadians.

North shore Lake Chapala, which includes the communities of Ajijic, Chapala, Jocotepec, San Antonio, and San Juan Cosala (40 minutes drive time from one end of north shore to the other), has several options for senior living with others being planned.

What is different from Canada and the U.S. is the cost of living, especially for health care, often up to two-thirds less.

What is also different is that there are no Life Planning (continuing care) models at Lake Chapala. A project was planned three years ago and has yet to be built. There is one, however, that will open in Mexico City sometime this fall.

Another difference is that in Canada and the U.S. Alzheimer’s and dementia patients are in separate areas on a campus. In most of Mexico, dementia patients are living and sharing the same space with older adults who have mobility issues, not dementia issues, and the care is rarely specialized.

Mexican senior homes are under the purview of the Ministry of Public Health and local fire departments. They are not tightly regulated and inspected as they are in Canada and the U.S.

What is available at Lake Chapala now?

  • Three co-housing/independent living options – one in Ajijic with three individual apartments and five casitas, a pool, lakeside views, and two meals a day; one in Riberas del Pilar on two levels where residents have their own apartment, are provided with two meals a day, and have access to a library, a gym, and a pool; and one in San Juan Cosala, focusing on health, green living, and sustainability.

    At the first two if you become immobile or develop serious health issues you would need to move. At the property in San Juan Cosala (in development) you can invite caregivers to your living quarters.

  • Three assisted living homes specializing in Alzheimer’s and dementia care – one is run by a geriatrician and a nurse, the other two by nurses with doctors on call. One of these homes plans to add a second home in the near future for a total of four dedicated Alzheimer’s care homes at the lake to meet the growing need.

  • Six homes combine assisted living, nursing and some rehabilitation.

    That number climbs to seven if you include two rooms above the offices of a physician in Ajijic (no rehab), and 9 if you include one owner who has three homes (no rehab).

    It climbs to 10 choices with an American-owned recovery care center for plastic surgery (more like a B & B) where you can also rent suites. The recovery center has been in existence for almost 20 years.

    The total number of choices reaches 11 if you include a low-income senior home in Chapala which also has Mexican residents.

  • Four properties have owners who live on site. These properties are either American- or Canadian-owned, or, owned by English-speaking Mexicans who focus on serving the expat community. There usually is one person who speaks English at the senior living options at Lake Chapala.

The above-mentioned places are private pay. Monthly costs for private pay assisted living at Lake Chapala range between $1,000 and $2,000 U.S. per month except for the home in Chapala. (The average U.S. private pay is $3200-$3500, and up to $12,000/month or more for Alzheimer’s care).

Most care homes at the lake have 12 or fewer residents. Service is considered personalized. In many instances there is the quality of “carino,” caregivers treating you like a lovable member of the family.

There are 125 senior living homes in the state of Jalisco, housing 1,723 elders. These numbers include only Mexican citizens. Not included are Americans and Canadians at Lake Chapala or in Puerto Vallarta. There are approximately 758,000 older adults in Jalisco state.

In Guadalajara, an hour from Lake Chapala, there are three models of senior care – private pay, non-profit care primarily with nuns (usually excellent quality), and government care (usually DIF, a social services entity that exists throughout Mexico). Prices range from gratis for the indigent to around $400-$800 U.S. for those with pensions, and up to $3500 U.S. for private pay.

Note: I have met Americans with incomes of $600 or less/month who are living comfortably and safely in Mexican assisted living homes throughout the country.

Resources:

Canadian retirees make new homes in Mexico

Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia National Institute of Statistics and Geography

US State Department – Relations with Mexico

* Cover photo of Lake Chapala courtesy of en.wikipedia.org
** Map of Lake Chapala region courtesy of mexico-insights.com

 

August 4, 2016 at 9:43 pm Leave a comment

International Geriatric/Gerontology Conference Guadalajara 2016 – Focus on Dementia

The Hospital Civil “Fray Antonio Alcalde”, also known as the Old Civil Hospital, produced its 21st International Geriatric and Gerontology Symposium July 7-9, 2016, at the Hilton Hotel auditorium in Guadalajara, Mexico. The theme was “Enfermedades Neurodegenerativas en la Vejez”, or, Neurodegenerative Illness in Older Adults.

There were about 250 attendees as well as one pharmaceutical company (Asofarma de Mexico, S.A.), one hospital supply company from Switzerland, and a private pay day care senior center (www.vidavi.mx) offering business cards, pamphlets, free pens, and carry bags to participants in the registration area.

Four geriatric physicians from the hospital organized the event – Dr.David Leal Mora (the international section), Dr.Hector Ivan Cruz Neri, Dr. Julio Alberto Dias Ramos, and Dra Rocio Garcia Talavera. Guest speakers were from Guadalajara, Leon, Mexico City, and the U.S.

Old Civil Hospital Geriatrics Symposium, Guadalajara, 2016

Old Civil Hospital Geriatrics Symposium, Guadalajara, 2016   Dr. Rocio Garcia is at the podium, Dr. David Leal is the first man on the left with dignitaries from the public hospital system

There were memorable talks about the Use and Abuse of Antipsychotic Drugs, Managing the Symptoms of Parkinson’s, When a Day is 36 Hours, Evidence-Based Geriatrics, Government Assistance Programs for Older Adults, and Can We Prevent Dementia?

Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH, Professor of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins

Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH, Professor of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins, and author

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What stood out most were the physicians, both American and Mexican, who are exploring and interested in alternative non-drug options for dementia prevention. The common theme – we must all be vigilant in keeping our cognitive skills sharp to the very end, if possible.

(Have been working seven days for the last two months and will add more notes about the conference at a later date).

Topic-Related Resources:

Israeli physicians have developed a surgery to remove shaking due to Parkinson’s disease http://healthamazing.co/2016/07/13/first-in-israel-surgery-that-removes-shaking-due-to-parkinsons-disease/

http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-stone-solvadi-drug-pricing-20160705-snap-story.html   By Daniel Stone, MD, internal medicine and geriatric specialist, Los Angeles, and, Pres of LA Society of Internists. Another physician calling for a stop to the increasing costs of drugs and “pharma greed”.

http://www.AlzheimersDementiaSummit.com focusing on dementia prevention and alternative remedies that already exist for protecting our brains and our minds. Produced by Jonathan Landsman, a natural health advocate with physicians and others as guest speakers – Dr. Russell Blaylock, Dr. David Jockers, Donna Gates, Dr. Mark Hyman, Josh Axe, Sayer Ji, Michael T. Murray and many others. I missed this July 2016 summit on line but believe it might be available to listen to.

http://goodlifeawareness.com/men-may-be-able-to-avoid-dementia-by-marrying-intelligent-women-researchers-say/  Don’t know if the studies are true, but this article caught my attention.😉

http://yournewswire.com/harvard-professor-says-prescription-drugs-are-killing-population/utm_content=buffer7c70d&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer   article is not professionally written, has a sensational headline, and, requires quotes and some fact-based evidence.
http://seniorhousingnews.com/2016/08/17/communities-turn-to-marijuana-to-treat-memory-care-residents/?_hsenc=p2ANqtz-9Kxe5ppADrvnIp22h1hj0wP4zRi3r8rV1Y_cRXvTORbY5Zis0oK9cbZtcGubP25n_orIdb35T0M8nX7GJuMFljm_Bygw&_hsmi=33083300    article about successful use of marijuana (with family permission) instead of drugs to calm patients in northern California dementia care residence

July 31, 2016 at 5:08 am 2 comments

Mexican Palliative Care Thought Leader Dr. Susana Lua Speaks to Expats about Unmet Pain Relief Needs

Dra Susana Lua Nava, a palliative care physician based in Guadalajara, Mexico, spoke to over 200 North Americans and locals at Open Circle on the Lake Chapala Society grounds in Ajijic, Mexico about pain relief for chronic conditions and end-of-life.

Her passionate presentation about the unmet needs in Jalisco state and throughout the country triggered many questions from the audience, plus more interest in bringing such services to the lake. Lake Chapala is about an hour’s drive from Mexico’s second largest city Guadalajara. An estimated 20,000 North Americans reside there during high season.

Dra Susan Lua Nava, palliative care physician, addresses Open Circle

Dra Susan Lua Nava, palliative care physician, addresses Open Circle

It is a goal of Dra Lua’s non-profit Juntos Contra el Dolor, A.C., (United Against Pain), http://www.juntoscontraeldolor.com, to educate communities throughout Mexico about what palliative care is, and show how to offer comfort care to those with life-limiting diseases. Ideally, there would be models for this care in each state. Currently, palliative care is primarily found in three large cities at regional hospitals – Guadalajara, Mexico City, and Monterrey.

In 2009 the Ministry of Public Health of Mexico established guidelines for palliative care entitling all residents of the nation to relief from pain. The challenge has been that most people do not know exactly what palliative care is, nor where to find it. Palliative medicine is often confused with pain clinics which may offer medications but do not necessarily include a holistic support team for the patient and family members during such trying times.

As of yet, there is no dedicated palliative care/hospice team  – physicians, nurses, psychologists, social workers, clergy, and volunteers working together at Lake Chapala. There have been previous efforts to establish a hospice.  (The main cities at the lake are Ajijic, Chapala, San Juan Cosala, and Jocotopec. It takes around 40 minutes to drive from Chapala on the east end to Jocotopec on the western end).

There are a number of highly talented retired palliative care and hospice administrators, physicians, nurses, clergy, social workers, and others from Canada, the U.S., South Africa, and other countries at the lake. Several groups have formed to discuss how to establish a service that can serve all populations and will endure.

DVDs of the chat by Dra Lua can be ordered at http://www.opencircle-ajijic.org

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Wendy Jane Carrel acts as translator for Dr. Lua’s talk on palliative care in Mexico

I performed a Cliff Notes version of Dr. Lua’s talk as there was much to cover in a short amount of time.

A week after the presentation to North Americans, Dr. Lua gave a public health talk on the same subject to local Mexicans at the Ajijic Cultural Center.

June 29, 2016 at 9:05 pm 2 comments

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