Palliative Care & Hospice in Jalisco, Mexico; Health Talk at Lake Chapala March 25

A church at Lake Chapala, Mexico has kindly asked me to speak at one of their health seminars.
I will share what I have learned after 1 1/2 years assisting the only 24/7 palliative care and hospice model in Jalisco, Mexico, Juntos Contra el Dolor.  See http://www.juntoscontraeldolor.com
Details:
March 25,2017   Saturday, 10:30 a.m.  St. Andrew’s Anglican Church
Calle San Lucas 19, Riberas el Pilar, Chapala
Palliative Care and Hospice in Jalisco, Mexico  presented by Wendy Jane Carrel, M.A.
Palliative care and hospice options in Jalisco will be reviewed. There will be a discussion of what might one expect compared to the U.S. or Canada.
The talk is open to the public.

January 31, 2017 at 9:05 pm Leave a comment

Sacred, Dignified Death in a Mexican Palliative Care Hospital

I have been sitting hospice as a volunteer since 1999.

I currently have the honor of assisting at the only 24/7 palliative care hospital and hospice in the state of Jalisco, Mexico, http://www.juntoscontraeldolor.com, (United Against Pain).

It is beyond words to try and describe what I see and feel as patients come and go – those who get well, those who pass in our presence, those who have family, those who are estranged from family, those who have no family.

Every day is a lesson in human behavior, details of physical illness and care, psychology of illness, and feelings that occur as we observe pain and/or quiet passing of others. Every day, despite the circumstances, there is a demonstration of love.

In early 2016 we received a call from El Refugio (The Refuge) missionaries, a non-profit that rescues people from the streets of Guadalajara. They had found a tall (by American standards), emaciated man who appeared to be dying.

The man had been taken to the Hospital Civil Viejo (the Old Civil Hospital) where admittance was refused. The missionaries called in desperation. They remembered Juntos Contra el Dolor serves all regardless of economic position or faith. Everyone deserves a respectful end-of-life.

The  founder of the Juntos Contra el Dolor humanitarian model for Mexico, Dra Susana Lua Nava, urged the group to bring the man immediately. The man arrived dehydrated, malnourished, and appeared as though he would pass at any moment.

mural at entrance to Juntos Contra el Dolor

Mural at entrance to Juntos Contra el Dolor, palliative care hospital and hospice, Guadalajara, Mexico

We gently bathed him several times the first few days removing deep set black from his shoeless feet and body. We constantly changed the sheets and his gown. The odor was strong the first days and then dissipated. Around the fourth or fifth day the patient began to open his eyes. We started feeding him by mouth, little by little.

Each of us who entered his room – physicians, nurses, social workers and volunteers would have the same experience. We would talk to him, but he could only answer with sounds. At first we thought it was because he had lost almost all this teeth. We finally figured out he did not speak Spanish. He might have been a native Huichol from the mountains of Jalisco. We did not know.

But whenever we visited or fed him there would be light of appreciation in his eyes, and a slight smile on his strong, handsome face. When we stroked his forehead and hair or had our hands on his, he would bring our hands to his lips and kiss us. Tears would stream down his face. This is how he communicated. It made us wonder if he was ever attended to in his life. We too were moved. We felt a lot of compassion for him. We did our best to make him feel welcome and comfortable.

His name? He had no identification. One of the rescuers decided on “Rogelio”. We did not know his age. We guessed age 80. We did not learn the circumstances of his life of course. All we knew is that at this stage of his existence he was alone and abandoned. 

But we were there. And one of the missionaries would come when he could to stay by Rogelio’s side all night, as family members usually do.

There were humming sounds of prayer in the room each day from those who stood by him.

In less than two weeks Rogelio passed in the early morning hours, veladoras (candles) burning. I was there alone with the night nurse. We bathed and diapered him. We wrapped his hands and head in gauze. We wrapped him in a new sheet with his face peeking out. I silently talked to him and wished him a good transition. I cannot speak for others who tended to him but his presence was an inexplicable gift.

Most of the patients who come to us (or whom we go to at home) are surrounded by innumerable family members. Rogelio was no longer without support. Hopefully, we gave him a dignified death.

Miraculously, El Refugio found a way to pay for his cremation. They found a place for his remains under a tree (we do not know where) and said prayers for him. He was cared for by everyone along his journey. See https://www.facebook.com/elrefugio.cuarto    Note: When unknown persons pass in Guadalajara their remains are placed in an unmarked communal grave in the city cemetery.

Rest in peace dear Rogelio.

December 31, 2016 at 6:58 pm 4 comments

How Caregiving A Dying Husband Taught a Journalist Appreciation for Living

PBS News Hour features a short talk by Tracy Grant, Washington Post editor, about how caring for her terminally ill husband offered an understanding of quality of life and made her own life worth living. (See link at end of blog for video).

As a caregiver, palliative care worker and hospice volunteer, I agree with what Grant communicates. We all become our better selves while caring for others. The ill teach us so much. Their gifts to us last a lifetime. The experiences can be remarkable.

Tracy Grant

Tracy Grant, Deputy Managing Editor, Washington Post

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/tag/tracy-grant/

December 31, 2016 at 3:42 pm Leave a comment

International Day of the Older Adult is Celebrated in Guadalajara, Mexico

The International Day of Older Adults is celebrated, by proclamation of the United Nations, on October 1 every year.

In Mexico this event dovetails with the country’s Senior Day at the end of September. Festivities are held at senior centers, senior homes, and on DIF (government social service) grounds.

For those of you who haven’t been to Mexico, especially Guadalajara, its “tapatio” residents love to sing and dance no matter their age. Being around these folks will automatically lift your spirits. They love to dress up, eat well, and have fun.  Most of all, they never give up despite mobility issues or aches and pains.

Tapatio singing seniors

Tapatio singing seniors

In Mexico there are 7.5 million persons 70 or older. This number is expected to reach 8.5 million in 2020, and 10.2 million by 2030.  According to the Mexican government, at 60 you are an older adult. It is unclear why the number of boomers and persons ages 60-70 are not included in the Mexican government statistics (INEGI) reports.

In the U.S. there are 70-80 million adults who  will be over 65 by 2020.

This year I attended the Asilo Juan Pablo II senior day festivities (see earlier post September 2016) at http://www.WellnessShepherd.com .

Last year I attended an event at DIF’s Centro de Amistad Internacional (Center of International Friendship) on Calle Eulogio Parra 2539 just off Lopez Mateo in Guadalajara. It was co-hosted by the Office of Older Adults for the State of Jalisco, Mexico and by INAPAM ( the National Institute for Older Adults, est. in 2002). It was held on the first Sunday of October from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Groups of seniors performed dances, ladies were offered free beauty treatments by the Irma de Zuniga make-up academy located on Lopez Cotilla in downtown Guadalajara (www.irmadezuniga.com), there were talks by gerontologists, nutritionists and others experts. Jhre Chacon and his team of healing touch trainees from UNCOA offered massages, Reiki, and other relaxing experiences for the guests. There were also poetry readings and card games.

Tapatio caballeros

Tapatio caballeros

 

older adult folkloric dancers, Guadalajara

older adult folkloric dancers, Guadalajara

 

healing touch holistic care for older adults, Guadalajara

healing touch holistic care for older adults, Guadalajara, offered by UNCOA

 

Queen for a Day make-up gift for older adults, Guadalajara

Queen for a Day make-up gift for older adults, Guadalajara

Ana Maria Luz Garcia, owner of the historic restaurant La Fonda de Arcangel Miguel (www.fondasanmiguelarcangel.com, housed in a colonial convent in the center of Guadalajara), hosted the buffet breakfast/brunch. Garcia is a passionate advocate for healthy living at any age.

Consuelo Manzo Chavez, Director of Older Adults for DIF presided with Alma Solis Montiel, who at the time was the Director of INAPAM but is now the Director General of the Institute for Older Adults for the State of Jalisco.

International Day of Older Adults with DIF and INAPAM Directors & amigita Leila

International Day of Older Adults with Senior Care Advisor Wendy Jane Carrel, DIF Director Consuelo Manzo Chavez, and former INAPAM Director Alma Solis – now Director of the Institute of Older Adults for the state of Jalisco, with unidentified older adult, and human rights attorney Laila Martinez de Santiago

October 6, 2016 at 1:40 pm 1 comment

Mexico Palliative Care Non-Profit Holds Festive Fundraiser in Super-Competitive Environment

Mexican non-profits have a hard time surviving. One can say many non-profits, no matter the country, find it challenging to be sustainable.

In the state of Jalisco, there are over 800 registered A.C.’s, Asociaciónes Civiles, or non-profits. In all of Mexico, there are about 4,000 registered non-profits. That’s a lot of competition in a land where philanthropy, though existent, is not part of the culture.

Juntos Contra el Dolor of Guadalajara is a remarkable entity. It is a Mexican model for palliative care and hospice. Its resourceful, enthusiastic founder and palliative care educator Dra Susana Lua Nava is an ecumenical nun. Her team serves anyone of any belief system or economic background. All are dedicated to offering holistic pain relief for life-limiting conditions or at end-of-life.

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Administration volunteer Michele Carrillo, Madre Martina Zumaya Head of Nursing, Dra Susana Lua Nava founder, Dra Karla Rebollar of Juntos Contra el Dolor A.C.

In 2014 Dra Susana Lua Nava and Juntos Contra el Dolor received the prestigious state of Jalisco IJAS award for outstanding contributions by a non-profit.

Juntos Contra el Dolor’s 24/7 humanitarian effort includes not only medical attention at its 8-bed hospital but outreach and education to 65 or more patients and their families at home. For a Mexican non-profit dependent on donations, this is an achievement. Faith in the need, faith in all possibilities, and a lot of love are components of the Juntos ability to continue despite obstacles.

Every member of the team is a volunteer except the nurses. The team consists of palliative care doctors, psychologists, social workers, chaplains, and trained volunteers.

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Four social workers, two MD’s (far right), all Juntos Contra el Dolor volunteers

Juntos Contra el Dolor held its annual fundraiser, a Fiesta Mexicana gala, on Saturday, September 24.

The nuns and volunteers led by Dra Susana Lua Nava proved to be creative and super organized.
Every detail was attended to – philodendron plants, potted geraniums, Viva Mexico banners, red/green/white flags hanging from the ceilings, red/green/white bow ties over white blouses or shirts so people would know who the volunteers were, donated chocolate cake from one of the best bakeries in town, clean white table cloths and chair covers, a tequila bar, a hand-made hot organic corn tortilla corner, and a place for photos where guests could dress like a revolutionary from the Mexican independence. Fresh quality food included 10 guisados (entrees) prepared with love and served in Mexican pottery, a rarity at charity events in Jalisco. And, there was a romantic singing group Los Bohemios, plus an all-girl mariachi band dressed in hot pink and silver!!  A lively event and fun for all.
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Sweet volunteers Lola, Maria, and Nena

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Volunteer Juan with his lovely, sensitive mother – his father, her husband, passed away at Juntos Contra el Dolor in June 2016

beautiful Mexican ladies of the San Bernardo parish

beautiful Mexican ladies of the San Bernardo parish

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junior guests

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All-girl mariachi band from Guadalajara

Juntos Contra el Dolor provides weekly consultations in a donated space in San Augustin, a suburb to the west of Guadalajara. By January 2017 there will  be consultations for those suffering from pain at Lake Chapala, an hour from Guadalajara. The offices will be in the Church of San Juan Batista in San Juan Cosala.

As mentioned, the non-profit stays afloat by donations – usually in-kind support such as diapers, linen, paper supplies, fresh organic food, and new medicines.At the following link you can read what is needed and where one can make donations.  http://juntoscontraeldolor.com/Donaciones/don.html

Dr. Lua received three years of specialized palliative care training in the Canary Islands with Dr. Marcos Gomez Sancho, considered the leading palliative care physician and professor of the Latin world. Dr. Lua is a thought leader for Mexico, and author of  El Enfermo: Terreno Sagrado  (The Ill: Sacred Terrain).

September 26, 2016 at 7:18 pm Leave a comment

Abandoned Elders Rescued in Ecuador

 

Wendy Jane Carrel with Diosalinda at rescue home in Chordeleg, Ecuador

Senior Care Specialist and health journalist Wendy Jane Carrel with Diosalinda at rescue home in Chordeleg, Ecuador

For those of you who haven’t seen it before, above is a photo of yours truly with Diosalinda. She led a terrible life of abuse by family before she was rescued by a home for abandoned seniors in Chordeleg, Ecuador four years ago. If I had funds, I would have adopted her. Such a gentle, loving, sensitive soul for all she endured.

Did you notice the Dios in the name Diosalinda? Dios = God in Spanish. At the end of her life she finally has peace, protection, and safety.

 

Please find below a link to my article at http://www.CuencaHighLife.com  on how impoverished and abandoned elders are rescued in Ecuador. It is far from complete, but it is based on site visits to almost every province in the country.

Abandoned and impoverished elders: A looming crisis in Ecuador and worldwide

September 5, 2016 at 2:43 pm 1 comment

Mexico Honors Older Adults August 28, Dia del Adulto Mayor 2016

sweet resident with sweet volunteer Mari

Sweet Zenaida, daughter of Juan Pablo II resident Jose, with precious volunteer Mari who is not only a warm greeter at the home but is part of the outreach to over 30 seniors in the neighborhood

This week Guadalajara, Mexico has seen senior centers, DIF (government social services), non-profits serving older adults, and private sector senior residences celebrating Mexico’s Day of the Older Adult, also referred to as Dia de los Abuelos (Day of the Grandparents). The occasion has been feted every August 28 since 1982.

Guadalajara’s parish of San Bernardo, a social justice block with a church serving 3,000 parishioners, houses a two floor senior home, Asilo Juan Pablo II,  where festivities have been in full force. (The diocese also provides a school for Downs Syndrome children, a rehabilitation home for over 50 men, and a palliative care and hospice with 8 beds and outreach to 65 patients, Juntos Contra el Dolor). The Sr. Cura of the Church, Father Engelberto Polino Sanchez is the guardian for the community.

On Saturday, August 27, DIF sponsored a breakfast for the 52 male and female residents. On Sunday, August 28, Father Engelberto celebrated mass. Afterward, the older adults enjoyed a meal of pozole (a stew of vegetables, hominy, and pork) served with jamaica (a hibiscus drink), plus live Mexican music provided by an electric piano and a singer. Mexicans love festivities and the seniors at Asilo Juan Pablo II are no different. They were happy campers.

Below are photos commemorating those in support of older adults, as well as the appreciative seniors who live at Asilo Juan Pablo II. It is a Mexican custom for the older generation not to smile too quickly in photos. An exception, the charming church priests below with their energy of light…

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Sr. Cura Engelberto who presided mass for the seniors on Mexican Day of Older Adults pictured with Padre Francisco of Templo de San Bernardo, Guadalajara

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Reverent seniors, about 30 of whom are wheel chair bound at Asilo Juan Pablo II, Guadalajara, attending mass on Mexico’s Day of Older Adults

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senior who is not feeling well with Alicia, an adorable favorite enjoying pozole

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disabled senior with super attentive wife who kindly dances with and cheers up other seniors

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Severely disabled man Eliseo who is not a senior, rescued from the street and given a home at Asilo Juan Pablo II.  He is popular for his enthusiasm

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Dancing at Day of the Older Adults, Asilo Juan Pablo II, Guadalajara, Mexico

Note:  The Juan Pablo II home, a non-profit, is well run. There are challenges with raising funds and providing enough for the residents. The home survives successfully, none the less. Seniors with pensions pay for private or shared rooms. There are indigent seniors who have been rescued. One disabled man around the age of 50, was found in the streets and is living most contentedly at the assisted living, as mentioned in photo above.

The dedicated administrator Bertha C. Gonzalez offers a clean, efficient service with good standards for quality of life in Mexico, up to and including Mexican carino (kindness and care). She hand selects and supervises a team of nursing assistants and nurses, many of whom are sent by various schools to train at the home. Every day there is occupational therapy and some form of physical workout. Every other day there is entertainment, among other activities. Many residents are talented artists, handicrafts experts, and poets. The home is connected to the large church so that those in wheelchairs can attend services easily. Being Catholic is not a requirement for residency. The home is currently full. There is a waiting list.

The senior home has outreach to around 30 elders living in the neighborhood through its volunteer group Asilo en Salida. Mari, featured in the first photo, also goes out with the group.  For more information about the activities write to asiloensalida@gmail.com

Contact info:

Asilo Juan Pablo II  Pro Dignidad Humana, AC   asilojp@prodigy.com.mx

Av. Plan de San Luis #1616  Col. Mezquitan Country  tel. 3824-5368

Sr. Cura Engelberto Polino Sanchez, Director General

Bertha C. Gonzalez, Administrator    Maria Delores Cortes, social worker

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Asilo-Juan-Pablo-II-San-Bernardo-100984640248947/

 

August 31, 2016 at 11:47 am Leave a comment

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