Death and Dying Education, End-of-Life Education, End-of-Life Planning, Palliative Care

Author Katy Butler Talks about Medical Reform for End-of-Life with Healthcare Workers in San Francisco

In early November, New York Times best-selling author (Knocking on Heaven’s Door) Katy Butler gave a talk focused on themes from her new 2019 book The Art of Dying Well at Sutter Health CPMC in San Francisco. Approximately 100 healthcare workers participated.

I was fortunate enough to attend and briefly meet Katy and her husband Brian, also active in humanitarian and senior care issues.

The event gave Butler a chance to share compelling, medically complicated personal stories relating to the passing of her parents and friends. She also spoke about her commitment to compassionate care and the human right to die with dignity and grace when possible.

Katy Butler reading from her book THE ART OF DYING WELL

I found what she had to say authentic, heartfelt, and practical… especially her reminders that a good many of us working in senior care and palliative care find imperative to share with others – make a plan for end-of-life if you haven’t already, find your tribe (who will be there for you, presuming your demise is not sudden), stay in charge (ask for what you want and need), and “bring in the sacred.”

Katy hosts a Facebook group entitled Slow Medicine, based on principles in the book of the same name by her Bay Area colleague and friend Dr. Victoria Sweet, calling for change in medical practices. Quality of life over invasive and perhaps unnecessary procedures, especially at end-of-life.

Notable aside: Butler, a Buddhist, was lay-ordained by Thich Nhat Hanh, Vietnamese monk and peace activist. She lived seven months at his Plum Village retreat in France, among other significant life experiences.

See http://www.katybutler.com/author/about/

The evening was part of an on-going lecture series from Ungerleider Palliative Care, a non-profit affiliated with End Well.

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